How to make a two-peg spool knit paracord lanyard

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  How to make a two-peg spool knit paracord lanyard
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More knotty stuff on my blog: http://stormdrane.blogspot.com
Amazon Affiliate http://amzn.to/1n2Bc9S
Higher resolution supplies photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/stormdrane/13905373812/

The two-peg spool knit can be found in 'The Ashley Book of Knots' as #2878, a Square Loop Sinnet, along with other variations.

For quick deployment of the cord, should you need to repurpose it from the lanyard, just cut off one end below the lanyard knot, unlock the knit by pulling the end strand out of the loop, and pull to quickly unravel the length of cord.

Many of my spool knitting blog posts date back over the past several years, so folks don't know to look there for the info, and since I still get lots of questions, I finally added this video. One of my older videos shows starting a lanyard on a three-peg spool. http://youtu.be/Xk4ZFHY3Pzo

A few links added below of some of my other blog posts with spool knitting projects:

Two colors on a 4-peg spool: http://stormdrane.blogspot.com/2007/10/two-tone-braided-lanyardwrist-strap-in.html

Adding a core strand: http://stormdrane.blogspot.com/2007/08/few-folks-asked-me-how-i-braided-around.html

Spare cord carry on a boonie hat: http://stormdrane.blogspot.com/2007/09/heres-another-way-to-carry-50-feet-of.html

A necklace: http://stormdrane.blogspot.com/2007/06/type-i-od-green-paracord-braided.html

Working with just two pegs is similar to using a 'lucet', a two-pronged fork cord making textile tool, dating back at least as far as the middle ages. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucet

How much cord is needed for a particular project varies by cord diameter and the spool peg spacing you intend to use, how many pegs being used, so although there may be a mathematical formula for each instance, it would be different for every project, I usually just overestimate what I think I'll need and add more to that, better to have too much than to come up short on a project. If you do come up short, you could always sew/melt/glue/knot in more cord to continue.

You can improvise and make your own spools or buy them at craft stores/online, but making your own is recommended to get the knit however tight or loose, stiff or flexible as you prefer. You can use nails, cotter pins, bobby pins along with PVC pipe, epoxy, and tape, or make them from wood, aluminum, steel, or toilet paper roll cardboard tubes and popsicle sticks. ;)

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